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Events

Thank you for your interest in METRO’s upcoming events! If you’d like to help shape our programming:

For virtual, on-demand learning, take a look at tutorials offered by lynda.com and request free access here.

We are committed to providing a welcoming and productive environment for all. Please check out our Code of Conduct for more information. Please reach out to us with your events-related questions; our email address is [email protected], and our phone number is (212) 228-2320.


  1. Teaching Research Data Management and Reproducibility: Ways to Engage Your Community in Research Stewardship


    Teaching Research Data Management and Reproducibility: Ways to Engage Your Community in Research Stewardship

    By understanding researchers' workflows, teaching data management is that much more efficient. In this session, Vicky Steeves (Librarian for Research Data Management and Reproducibility, New York University) will give an introduction to those looking to start offering services around research data management and reproducibility.

    Steeves will introduce the concepts, terminology, and best practices of data management and reproducibility from both the perspective of librarians and researchers. Steeves will also demonstrate existing open-source infrastructure and workflows that enable best practices in data management and working more with more reproducibility. Participants will experiment with online tools, engage in discussions, and work on small group activities. Folks walking away from this workshop will have a better idea of how to engage with researchers on these topics, offer more research services, and foster a community of stewardship within their institutions.

    Learning objectives:

    • Participants will gain an understanding of some basic concepts in data management and reproducibility
    • Participants will know about available tools that help work towards research reproducibility
    • Participants will understand how to offer and scale services around data management and reproducibility
    • Participants will be able to, at the very least, know what to look up when Googling

    This is an introductory workshop; no prerequisite knowledge or experience is required.

    What to bring:

    • A laptop (or click here to borrow one of METRO's for $5.00)

    About Our Instructor

    ​Vicky Steeves is the Librarian for Research Data Management and Reproducibility, a dual appointment between NYU's Division of Libraries and Center for Data Science. In this role, she works supporting students, faculty, staff, and researchers in creating well-managed, high quality, and reproducible research through facilitating use of tools such as ReproZip. Her research centers on integrating reproducible practices into the research workflow, advocating openness in all facets of research (code, data, analysis tools, etc.), and building/contributing to open infrastructure.​


    Register



  2. Getting Started with Web Archives: A beginner's workshop


    Getting Started with Web Archives:
    A beginner's workshop

    As our subjects, stakeholders, patrons, and donors increasingly engage each other and the world through online media, librarians and archivists are compelled to steward valuable born digital records into cohesive, preservable collections for future access and use. Web archiving--the process of collecting, preserving, and enabling access to web materials--presents a powerful opportunity for us to develop collections of these otherwise ephemeral resources. The most difficult step towards realizing this potential is often simply getting started; the daunting range of possible collecting scopes, policies, technologies, and workflows can stop a web archiving program before it starts. How does one define an achievable collecting mission, communicate their selection standards, and appropriate the necessary technical, human, and financial resources, without any practical experience in this emergent craft?

    Attendees to this workshop will overcome these obstacles with training and support from experts in the practice. The program will begin with a survey of web archiving that establishes a common level of understanding and language, progresses through case studies that represent the judgements and decisions to be made in designing a web archiving program, and conclude with a guided small-group exercise to design and make the first acquisitions into a model web archive.

    Specific learning objectives to this end include: understanding the nature and history of web archives as born digital collections; how to craft a mission-driven collection development policy for web archives; how to select among the available acquisition tools and descriptive standards to best support their patrons’ and stakeholders’ needs; and best practices for long-term preservation and access to these resources.

    What to bring:

    • A laptop (or click here to borrow one of METRO's PC laptops for $5.00).

    About our instructors:
    Karl-Rainer Blumenthal helps organizations and individuals to build web archives through software support, training, testing, and documentation, as a web archivist for the Internet Archive’s Archive-It service. His boundless enthusiasm for all things web archiving developed during his term as a National Digital Stewardship Resident with the New York Art Resources Consortium (NYARC). He has served as the founding co-chair of the Art Libraries Society of North America’s Web Archiving Special Interest Group and chair of the Society of American Archivists’ Web Archiving Section. Select publications include “A collaborative model for web archiving ephemeral art resources at the New York Art Resources Consortium” (with Sumitra Duncan in Art Libraries Journal, 2016) and “Digital Preservation Metadata Practice for Web Archives” (with Clément Oury & Sébastien Peyrard in Digital Preservation Metadata for Practitioners, 2016). Karl earned his BA in History of Art from Haverford College and his MS in Library and Information Science from Drexel University.

    Samantha Abrams is Web Resources Collection Librarian at Ivy Plus Libraries, where she coordinates the partnership's Web Resources Collection Program. Now in its first year, the Program is a collaborative collection development effort to build curated, thematic collections of freely available, but at-risk, web content in order to support research at thirteen participating Ivy Plus Libraries and beyond. Before Ivy Plus Libraries, Samantha worked at StoryCorps, where she managed the organization's digital and physical assets, including born-digital audio and photos, physical paperwork, and electronic databases. Samantha has additional experience working in public libraries, publishing, and as a corporate archivist for the fast-casual restaurant chain Culver's. She is the current Social Media Coordinator for the Society of American Archivists' Web Archiving Section, and in 2014 she was awarded the Future Steward Award by the National Digital Stewardship Alliance, which recognizes emerging leaders taking a creative approach to advancing the knowledge of digital preservation issues and practices. Samantha earned her Bachelor's in English from the University of Iowa, and her Master's in Library and Information Studies from the University of Madison-Wisconsin.


    Register



  3. (Mis)informed: Propaganda, Disinformation, Misinformation, and Our Culture


    (Mis)informed: Propaganda, Disinformation, Misinformation, and Our Culture

    Friday, June 1, 10:00 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. with Happy Hour / Propaganda Party to follow

    Our culture is overwhelmed with instances of incorrect information in many forms. From foreign actors to our social connections, misleading and often dangerous information has seemingly co-opted our online and offline spaces.

    Join us on Friday, June 1 to investigate the (social) media environment that allows incorrect information to thrive, seek a better understanding of the actors behind these events, and wax philosophical about the current state of counterfeit information and what this foreshadows about the library, archives, and museums community.

    Light breakfast snacks and happy hour munchies will be provided.

    Event schedule

    9:00 a.m. - 10:00 a.m. - Registration / light breakfast snacks

    10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m. - Opening keynote with danah boyd, president & founder, Data & Society

    11:15 a.m. - 12:15 p.m. - Contextualizing the Issues

    Present-Truth: Navigating the World of Fake (and Real) News

    • Ben Himmelfarb, White Plains Public Library

    News, Fake News, and Native Advertising

    • Rachel King, LIU Brooklyn

    12:30 p.m. - 1:00 p.m. - Midday keynote with David Carroll, The New School

    1:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m. - Lunch (offsite)

    2:15 p.m. - 2:45 p.m. - Converstaion: The history of propaganda & the myth of library neutrality

    2:45 p.m. - 3:45 p.m. - Technical Problems, Technical Solutions?

    What Do You Meme it’s Not Credible? Using Memes to Counter Misleading Information 

    • Christina Boyle, College of Staten Island

    What's New in Fake News Detection: Do automatic detection apps really work? 

    • Darcy Gervasio, SUNY Purchase

    4:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. - Data & Society breakout discussions

    5:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. - Happy Hour / Propaganda Party with Interference Archive


    Register



  4. Propaganda Party!


    We're thrilled to host a Propaganda Party with Interference Archive on June 1! The party starts after (Mis)informed: Propaganda, Disinformation, Misinformation, and Our Culture ends.

    Please RSVP here if you can't make the symposium but are down to (propaganda) party. Your $10 registration fee will go directly toward supporting Interference Archive.


    Register



  5. Podcasting 101: A Crash Course


    Kick off the summer months with this two-part podcasting workshop from 3:00 PM to 6:00 PM on:

    • Monday, June 4th
    • Tuesday, June 5th

    In this intensive workshop, you’ll get a heads-to-toes overview on how to get started with a podcast of your own.

    We’ll cover:

    • the different styles of podcasting (including shows you should be listening to!)

    • audio storytelling tips - inspiration for your format and content

    • recommended tools and techniques for both low and “no-budget” DIY podcasting, including audio production equipment (microphones, recorders, apps, etc.) and editing software

    • an overview of some of the ways to market, distribute, and monetize your podcast.

    The class format will be a combination of information sharing, conversation, hands-on activities, and case studies. Each participant will gain access to a bibliography of recommended books, equipment, resources, and, of course, podcasts for further listening and learning!

    No prior knowledge or experience is required.

    Agenda:

    • Story Planning & Project Goals
      The Podcast Lifecycle
      Self-Assessment/Taking Inventory Activity

    • DIY Tools & Techniques for Production
      What Goes Into Making a Podcast
      Recommended Equipment/Kits
      Recording Interviews - Tips & Techniques
      Demo: Apps for Recording
      Hands-On Practice: 2-minute Interview Activity

    • Editing
      Art of the Edit
      Editing Tips & Recommendations
      Demo: Editing Apps

    • Community
      Audience, Distribution, & Monetization Overview
      Case Study Activity



    What to bring:

    • A smartphone or tablet device is encouraged. 
      Laptops or other podcasting equipment is welcome (and the instructor is happy to help you get to know your own tools) but not required.


    About our instructor

    Ashley Maynor is an award-winning filmmaker and librarian who uses digital and analog technology to tell compelling stories. Her work as director includes the documentary For Memories’ Sake, which screened at the Library of Congress, the Nashville Film Festival, the Maryland Film Festival, and on the Southern Circuit Tour of Independent Filmmakers, among other venues, and the transmedia project, The Story of the Stuff.

    Maynor has previously been a Visiting Assistant Professor at Virginia Tech, an Assistant Professor at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville, and a production mentor for Stony Brook University’s MFA in Film program. She currently serves on the faculty of New York University Libraries.



    Register



  6. Join in! Let’s talk Microaggressions in LIS.


    Hello,
    Join the Racial and Social Justice in LIS Meetup and let’s discuss microaggressions, how they manifest in our daily work life, and the strategies that we use when confronted with them.

    We will divide our time by discussing and coming up with the language necessary to understand what are microaggressions, how they manifest in our work life, and the role of the institution in ameliorating microaggressions in the workplace.
    We will break into small groups and talk about the strategies that have helped us in those situations and those that haven’t helped us at all.

    The intention of this meetup is to provide a comfortable space where members can share their experience and strategies when confronted with microaggressions in library spaces.

    If possible, please watch this short video on microaggressions before the meetup.
    Microaggressions in Everyday Life https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BJL2P0JsAS4


    Register



  7. Web Archiving for All! An Introduction to Webrecorder


    Web Archiving for All! An Introduction to Webrecorder

    In this session, we will talk about ways to collect web content via free, open source software that runs in a web browser (Webrecorder.io). With a model of human-directed collecting (one page at a time), Webrecorder significantly lowers the barrier to collecting web content. Attendees will be given a high-level overview of Webrecorder’s features and engage in hands-on activities.


    Web archiving is important to the library/information field because, while so much contemporary culture takes shape or only exists online, this information is very susceptible to frequent change and loss. Selecting and collecting from social media will be important to represent current culture in New York and well beyond in the near and distant future. Many resources collected by libraries and archives, such as annual reports and course catalogs, are often no longer published on paper, but do get published to the web, so web archiving is essential to maintain or extend certain collections. With a tool like Webrecorder, anyone can get started with web archiving quickly, which is empowering both to information professionals/librarians and the communities they serve (especially if users are given information about using Webrecorder themselves).


    During this session, participants will:

    • Learn how to employ user-friendly, open source, browser-based software for archiving web content at no cost (Webrecorder).

    • Gain information on options for downloading web archives (WARC files) and get experience with software for accessing web archives (Webrecorder Player).

    • Leave with the ability to describe, manage and share their web collections online (via Webrecorder.io).


    No experience is expected or necessary. If you can browse the web you can collect with Webrecorder!

    What to bring:

    • A laptop (or click here to borrow one of METRO's PC laptops for $5.00). Please have Firefox or Chrome installed. Installing Webrecorder Player, which is freely available from Github, would be helpful but is not required.


    Agenda:

    • Hour 1:

      • Introductions, participants share goals/anticipated use cases

      • Overview of Webrecorder.io’s core tool sets followed by question time and brief discussion

      • Hands on activity to sign up for account, capture sample collection and review sample collection

      • Participants check back with group to discuss/reflect on progress

    • Hour 2:

      • Prompts or questions will be given to help participants envision how they could form meaningful small scale collections or augmentations to larger collections then start forming those collections while in this workshop. This can be done individually or in groups of 2-3 if participants would like to team up

      • Introduction to using pre-configured (remote) browsers and importing from public web archives

      • Overview of description, management and sharing features followed by an exercise to use these tools

    • Hour 3:

      • Demo of Webrecorder Player, an application for accessing/interacting with WARC files offline. Collections created earlier in the workshop can be downloaded and viewed in Webrecorder Player

      • Discuss the components of the practice of web archiving and explore how they could fit into existing and emerging digital preservation workflows through discussion  

      • If any time remains it can be used for further discussions, Q&A and/or ‘lab time’

    About our instructor:
    As Associate Director of Strategic Partnerships for Webrecorder, Anna Perricci builds communities of users and is leading planning for Webrecorder’s long term sustainability. Anna is the teacher of an introductory course on web archiving (Web Archiving Fundamentals) for the Society of American Archivists’ Digital Archives Specialist program. 2013-2015, she was instrumental to the establishment of a collaborative web archiving program for Ivy Plus libraries and has worked extensively with artists and activists including via the Occupy Wall Street Archives Working Group (2011-2013). She earned an MSI in Archives & Records Management and a graduate teaching certificate at the University of Michigan as well as a BA in history and a post-baccalaureate certificate in studio art from Brandeis University.



    Register



  8. Introduction to Omeka


    Introduction to Omeka
    To register for Advanced Omeka on June 25th, click here.

    Omeka is a free, flexible, and open source web-publishing platform for the display of library, museum, archives, and scholarly collections and exhibitions. This workshop will explain the basics of why and when to use Omeka and include a walkthrough of how to use Omeka to manage online collections and create digital exhibitions.


    In this workshop, participants will learn the following skills: how to determine what kind of Omeka site to set up based on experience and resources, how to set up an Omeka site on Omeka.net, how to add/edit an item to your Omeka site, how to add/edit files and item type metadata, how to create collections, how to change themes, and how to create an exhibition using your items.

    What to bring:

    • Although not required, attendees are encouraged to bring their own laptops with file transfer (i.e. Cyberduck, Filezilla) and text editing software (i.e. TextEdit, Notebook, TextWrangler, TextMate, Bbedit) installed.
      Click here to borrow one of METRO's PC laptops for $5.00.

    About our instructor:

    Kimon Keramidas is Associate Director and Clinical Assistant Professor in NYU’s Center for Experimental Humanities (formerly the John W. Draper Interdisciplinary Master’s Program). He is a cultural historian of media and technology whose teaching and work covers a wide range of topics and disciplines including digital humanities, personal computing and interface design, technology and pedagogy, media materiality, and intellectual property. Current projects include work co-curating an exhibition with the Freer|Sackler Asian Art Galleries of the Smithsonian Institute and a scholarly digital project on advertising and personal computing. Kimon is co-founder of New York City Digital Humanities(NYCDH) and The Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy, co-director of the queer public history project Outhistory.org, and co-investigator on the public history and design project History Moves. Prior to moving to NYU, Kimon was Assistant Professor and Director of the Digital Media Lab at the Bard Graduate Center. While there Kimon curated the exhibition The Interface Experience: Forty Years of Personal Computing. This multimodal interactive exhibition included a companion web application (http://interfaceexperience.org) and a book titled The Interface Experience: A User’s Guide, which won the 2016 Innovation in Print Design Award from the American Alliance of Museums.


    Register



  9. Photography & Photoshop Essentials, Part 1


    Photography & Photoshop Essentials, Part 1:
    Essential lighting techniques for 3D objects and flat art

    This session, originally scheduled for March 15th, will now take place on Thursday, June 21st.


    We are putting more and more of our cultural heritage objects online as digital images. Learn how to photograph 2- and 3-dimensional objects in a way that captures and enhances the detail and beauty of the originals. In this series we will cover techniques that you can apply to online exhibits, promotional materials, or digitization work.

    This first of three sessions centered around photography and Photoshop will give participants an introductory understanding of essential lighting techniques for 3D objects and flat art. Topics covered will include:

    ·      Understanding light

    ·      Types of light sources

    ·      Direct light vs. diffused light

    ·      Lighting techniques for three-dimensional objects

    ·      Lighting techniques for two-dimensional objects and flat art

    ·      Build your own DIY lighting Kit

    ·      Correcting Color balance and exposure in Adobe Photoshop


    No prerequisite knowledge or experience is required for this session. Students are encouraged to bring their own cameras in order to participate in hands-on exercises throughout the workshop.

    This series:

    • To register for Part 2 on June 27th, click here.
    • To register for Part 3 on June 28th, click here.

    About our instructor:
    Oscar Frasser is a professional image-maker and storyteller with a focus on human rights human rights issues and Latin American topics. With over 20 years of experience as a photographer, cinematographer and filmmaker, Oscar has worked extensively in the areas of documentary filmmaking, photojournalism, media education and advertising. Oscar has won multiple awards in both the United States and internationally for his films and photo exhibitions. Oscar is currently specializing his cinematography work with drones, teaching as an Adjunct Professor of Filmmaking­ at The New School and working as a freelancer in video and photojournalism for the Associated Press at the United Nations and Notimex, a National News Agency of Mexico.


    Register



  10. Advanced Omeka


    Advanced Omeka
    To register for Intro to Omeka on June 18th, click here.

    Building on the Introduction to Omeka workshop, this workshop will show you how to gain greater control of your Omeka installation. Participants will learn the difference between different deployments of Omeka, how to manage your own hosted Omeka installation, and how to use plugins, themes, HTML, CSS, and PHP to customize your collections and exhibitions. Some familiarity with web file transfers, web design, and content management system administration is recommended.


    In this workshop participants will learn the following skills: how to install and manage a self-hosted Omeka site, how to install and manage plugins and themes for an Omeka installation, how to add users to an Omeka site at different access levels, how to manage advanced settings for the appearance and operation of an Omeka site, and how to begin using HTML, CSS and PHP to customize the look and operation of your Omeka site.

    What to bring:

    • Although not required, attendees are encouraged to bring their own laptops with file transfer (i.e. Cyberduck, Filezilla) and text editing software (i.e. TextEdit, Notebook, TextWrangler, TextMate, Bbedit) installed.
      Click here to borrow one of METRO's PC laptops for $5.00.

    About our instructor:

    Kimon Keramidas is Associate Director and Clinical Assistant Professor in NYU’s Center for Experimental Humanities (formerly the John W. Draper Interdisciplinary Master’s Program). He is a cultural historian of media and technology whose teaching and work covers a wide range of topics and disciplines including digital humanities, personal computing and interface design, technology and pedagogy, media materiality, and intellectual property. Current projects include work co-curating an exhibition with the Freer|Sackler Asian Art Galleries of the Smithsonian Institute and a scholarly digital project on advertising and personal computing. Kimon is co-founder of New York City Digital Humanities(NYCDH) and The Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy, co-director of the queer public history project Outhistory.org, and co-investigator on the public history and design project History Moves. Prior to moving to NYU, Kimon was Assistant Professor and Director of the Digital Media Lab at the Bard Graduate Center. While there Kimon curated the exhibition The Interface Experience: Forty Years of Personal Computing. This multimodal interactive exhibition included a companion web application (http://interfaceexperience.org) and a book titled The Interface Experience: A User’s Guide, which won the 2016 Innovation in Print Design Award from the American Alliance of Museums.


    Register



  11. Photography & Photoshop Essentials, Part 2


    Photography & Photoshop Essentials, Part 2:
    Essential lighting techniques to photograph flat art, two-dimensional artwork, and retouching digital images in Adobe Photoshop

    We are putting more and more of our cultural heritage objects online as digital images. Learn how to properly photograph 2-dimensional objects in a way that captures and enhances the detail, texture and beauty of the originals. In this series we will cover techniques that you can apply to online exhibits, promotional materials, or digitization work.

    This second of three workshops centered on photography and Photoshop will give participants an introductory understanding of essential lighting techniques for 2D objects, paintings and flat art. Topics covered will include:

    ·      What is exposure?

    ·      How to control the correct exposure

    ·      Depth of field

    ·      Basic rules of composition

    ·      Lenses and the correct focal length to photograph artwork

    ·      Art work on a wall

    ·      Artwork on a table

    ·      Camera position

    ·      Positioning of light sources

    ·      Direct light vs. diffused light

    ·      Lighting techniques for two-dimensional objects with texture

    ·      Basic retouching, layers, color correcting and fixing distortions on the image.

    No prerequisite knowledge or experience is required for this session. Students are encouraged to bring their own cameras in order to participate in hands-on exercises throughout the workshop.

    This series:

    • To register for Part 1 on June 21st, click here.
    • To register for Part 3 on June 28th, click here.

    About our instructor:
    Oscar Frasser is a professional image-maker and storyteller with a focus on human rights human rights issues and Latin American topics. With over 20 years of experience as a photographer, cinematographer and filmmaker, Oscar has worked extensively in the areas of documentary filmmaking, photojournalism, media education and advertising. Oscar has won multiple awards in both the United States and internationally for his films and photo exhibitions. Oscar is currently specializing his cinematography work with drones, teaching as an Adjunct Professor of Filmmaking­ at The New School and working as a freelancer in video and photojournalism for the Associated Press at the United Nations and Notimex, a National News Agency of Mexico.


    Register



  12. Photography & Photoshop Essentials, Part 3


    Photography & Photoshop Essentials, Part 3:  
    Essential lighting techniques to photograph 3-dimensional artwork, sculptures, objects, and retouching the digital capture using Adobe Photoshop

    We are putting more and more of our cultural heritage objects online as digital images. Learn how to properly photograph 2- and 3-dimensional objects in a way that captures and enhances the detail texture and beauty of the originals. This series will cover techniques that you can apply to online exhibits, promotional materials, or digitization work.

    This third session will give participants an introductory understanding of essential lighting techniques for 3D objects, sculptures and artwork. Topics covered will include:

    Review on:

    ·      What is exposure?

    ·      How to control the correct exposure

    ·      Depth of field

    ·      Basic rules of composition

    ·      Lenses and the correct focal length to photograph 3D artwork

    ·      Camera position

    ·      Correct focal length to photograph artwork

    ·      Depth of field

    ·      Positioning light sources

    ·      Direct light vs. Diffused light on the surface

    ·      Lighting techniques for 3-dimensional objects with texture

    ·      Basic retouching, layers, color correcting and fixing distortions on the image.

    No prerequisite knowledge or experience is required for this session. Students are encouraged to bring their own cameras in order to participate in hands-on exercises throughout the workshop

    This series:

    • To register for Part 1 on June 21st, click here.
    • To register for Part 2 on June 27th, click here.

    About our instructor:
    Oscar Frasser is a professional image-maker and storyteller with a focus on human rights human rights issues and Latin American topics. With over 20 years of experience as a photographer, cinematographer and filmmaker, Oscar has worked extensively in the areas of documentary filmmaking, photojournalism, media education and advertising. Oscar has won multiple awards in both the United States and internationally for his films and photo exhibitions. Oscar is currently specializing his cinematography work with drones, teaching as an Adjunct Professor of Filmmaking­ at The New School and working as a freelancer in video and photojournalism for the Associated Press at the United Nations and Notimex, a National News Agency of Mexico.


    Register



  13. Storytelling with Video and Sound


    Join us at METRO for this three-part overview of DIY storytelling with video and sound on:

    • Thursday, July 12th from 5:00 PM - 8:00 PM;
    • Thursday, July 19th from 5:00 PM - 8:00 PM; and
    • Thursday, July 26th from 5:00 PM - 8:00 PM

    These three sessions will provide a broad understanding of the process, conceptualization, pre-production, production and post-production of filming a short story using a smartphone or DSLR camera with a do-it-yourself approach.

    Participants will explore their own creativity, interests, and personal strengths in various technologies and their role in the production process. They will examine the underlying forms, principles and processes of filmmaking/photography as both makers and consumers, while designing a project in the areas of film, photography, sound, lighting and post-production using digital media. This course focuses on the basic use of a range of equipment and software as applied to practical and friendly approaches to storytelling.


    Ideally, the student will produce a final film project in one of the following forms: a short documentary, a short narrative, a photo-essay, or an experimental piece, no longer than 3 - 5 minutes.


    Day 1, July 12th

    • Hour 1:

      • Introductions and topics

        • Understanding the idea, goals, and audience

        • The video-making process

        • Video Fundamentals (The shot)

        • The B-roll

        • Writing a script and making the shot list / storyboards

        • Pre-Production

        • Production

        • Post-Production

    • Hour 2:

      • Storytelling Techniques

      • Introduction to mobile filmmaking equipment

      • An introduction to Filmic Pro app

      • Basic Rigging of a DSLR and smartphone

      • The crew

    • Hour 3:

      • Filming exercise:
        Basic interpretation of the shot list, storyboard and compiling coverage

      • Downloading filmic material and sound

    Assignment: TBD

    Day 2, July 19th

    • Hour 1:

      • Review assignments

      • Equipment: video, lighting, sound, post production

    • Hour 2:

      • Location Tips

      • Creating mood with lighting

      • Audio (appropriate microphones)

      • Setting up and executing a basic Interview

    • Hour3:

      • Hands-on Interview Exercise

    Assignment: TBD

    Day 3, July 26th

    • Hour 1:

      • Review assignments

      • Editing on a timeline

      • Essential editing techniques

      • Essential audio techniques

      • Appropriate output codecs to export your short.

    • Hour 2:

      • Hands on Editing exercise to finish individual shorts

    • Hour 3:

      • Screening of individual shorts

    What to bring:

    • A laptop (or click here to borrow one of METRO's for $5.00).

      Please have Adobe Premier Pro pre-loaded. If you don't own a license, you can download a free, 7-day trial version of Creative Cloud here.


    About our instructor:

    Oscar Frasser is a professional image-maker and storyteller with a focus on human rights human rights issues and Latin American topics. With over 20 years of experience as a photographer, cinematographer and filmmaker, Oscar has worked extensively in the areas of documentary filmmaking, photojournalism, media education and advertising. Oscar has won multiple awards in both the United States and internationally for his films and photo exhibitions. Oscar is currently specializing his cinematography work with drones, teaching as an Adjunct Professor of Filmmaking­ at The New School and working as a freelancer in video and photojournalism for the Associated Press at the United Nations and Notimex, a National News Agency of Mexico.



    Register



Policies

Payment

We accept payment by credit card or by invoice. Please note that we do not accept cash payment, on site or otherwise.

Workshop Cancellation

METRO reserves the right to cancel any workshop or to substitute instructors. In the event of a cancellation, postponement, or substitution, registrants will be notified in advance (if possible) via email and may receive a full refund of the registration fee.

Participant Cancellation

All registration cancellations must be submitted in writing to [email protected]

In order to receive a refund, we must receive your cancellation email at least 24 hours prior to the event start time. If METRO does not receive your cancellation email before that deadline, an invoice will be sent to recoup any unpaid fees. If you are unable to attend a workshop, you may choose to send another person in your place without penalty if you notify us in advance. Refunds are provided by credit card or check and will be processed within about four weeks.

Private Space

METRO will make private space available to nursing mothers upon request. Please contact us at [email protected] to make a reservation.