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Events

Policies

Thank you for your interest in METRO’s upcoming events! If you’d like to help shape our programming:

METRO also offers a limited number of scholarships to members who wish to participate in professional development events, networking opportunities, and learning programs (whether sponsored by METRO or not). All current individual members and institutional member employees are eligible to apply.

We are committed to providing a welcoming and productive environment for all. Please check out our Code of Conduct for more information. Please reach out to us with your events-related questions; our email address is [email protected], and our phone number is (212) 228-2320.


  1. Archiving Oral Histories


    Oral histories are a great way to capture stories about past events and human experiences. But preserving and providing access to audio can be a challenge. This panel, organized in collaboration with the Urban Listeners Working Group and NYU's Urban Democracy Lab, will help answer some pressing questions. Questions like:

    • What does an oral history interviewer and/or project manager need to know about archives if they want to share collections online?

    • What are some techniques for providing access while respecting privacy?

    • How can oral historians use OHMS to catalog and provide access to audio?

    • What tools are out there to archive audio?

    About the panelists:

    Kerri Willette is a Senior Consultant and Aviary Product Manager at AVP in Brooklyn. She has over 18-years of experience leading collaborative projects that support access, care, and preservation of unique materials and content in libraries, archives, and museums. Her career has included metadata creation, system selection and migration, and digital project work at various institutions in the Midwest and New York, including DePaul University Libraries, The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Columbia College Chicago, University of Wisconsin-Parkside, and the Metropolitan New York Library Council (METRO). Most recently, Kerri served as the Deputy Director at METRO, overseeing four major program areas offering training, software, and data services to more than 250 library and archival organizations in New York City.

    Sady Sullivan is an oral historian with over a decade’s experience building community-engaging oral history projects and establishing digital strategies for oral history as an outreach tools for libraries, archives, museums, and movement building. Sady revitalized a dormant oral history program at Brooklyn Historical Society, and created Crossing Borders, Bridging Generations, an award-winning oral history project, racial justice dialogue series, and digital humanities site exploring mixed-heritage identity. Previously, she was Curator for the Columbia Center for Oral History Archives at Columbia University, 2014-2016; and Director of Oral History at Brooklyn Historical Society, 2006 - 2014. Oral history interviews that Sady collected have been used as primary sources for K-12 curricula, walking tours, podcasts, books, including Manhattan Beach by Jennifer Egan, and public history exhibitions at Brooklyn Historical Society, New-York Historical Society, El Museo del Barrio, and Brooklyn Navy Yard BLDG92. Sady holds a BA from Wellesley College and an MA in Cultural Reporting and Criticism from NYU. http://www.sadysullivan.com/

    Brett Dion is Bank Street College of Education's archivist and occasional oral history interviewer. Prior to Bank Street, Brett was the Oral History Project Archivist at Brooklyn Historical Society, where he was responsible for digitizing, processing, and describing the legacy Voices of Generations oral history collections, managing a team of interns, and later processing the contemporary Voices of Crown Heights oral histories. Previously, Brett worked as the Registrar and Archives Technician for the New York Transit Museum. He holds a BA in Communications from Hofstra University and a Master’s of Science with Archives Certification from Pratt Institute’s School of Information, where he graduated with distinction.

    We wish to provide a welcoming environment to visitors of all abilities. Please let us know if you require ability assistance by contacting [email protected] in advance of this event.


    Register



  2. Introduction to Python and ArchivesSnake for Archivists


    Ever need to make mass changes to your archival description? Need a list of accessions for the last year? Python is a powerful way to read and manipulate your ArchivesSpace data at scale, and ArchivesSnake manages the API calls for you, so you can read, sort, and edit your titles, dates, and notes with only a few lines of code. This workshop introduces archivists to the basics of Python and teaches them how to write basic scripts to work with the ArchivesSpace API.

    This workshop is designed for archivists who have experience working with archival description, and want to learn how to work with data at scale, and explore Python as a tool to streamline or automate their workflows. Attendees will lean how to create and run Python scripts on their local computer and the basics of Python syntax. After that, they will dive right in and edit or write some code to query, reformat, and edit archival data with an ArchivesSpace instance that will be provided.

    You might not become a Python pro in one afternoon, but this workshop will give you a foundation and some basic skills and examples that will later help you explore on your own. Come dive in and learn what is possible with Python and ArchivesSpace!

    After completing this workshop, attendees will know how to:

    • Create and run Python scripts

    • Install packages with PIP

    • Understand data types

    • Use basic Python syntax, including

      • If/else conditionals

      • For loops

      • Variables

      • Understand the ArchivesSpace API

      • Install and configure ArchivesSnake

      • Query and edit data using the ArchivesSpace API


    Requirements:

    • A laptop with the ability to install local software.

    • Some comfort with the command line is helpful, but only a willingness to learn is required.

    • Prior understanding of archival description and/or ArchivesSpace data will be helpful, but experience with ArchivesSpace is not required.


    About our Instructor:

    Gregory Wiedeman is the University Archivist at the M.E. Grenander Department of Special Collections & Archives at the University at Albany, SUNY. In addition to ensuring long-term access to the university’s permanent public records, Greg oversees UAlbany’s ArchivesSpace, ArcLight and Hyrax instances and many of the department’s technical services workflows. He has performed code reviews for ArchivesSpace, contributed to ArchivesSnake, and has experience using Python to manipulate archival description and automate workflows between a variety of open source tools.


    We wish to provide a welcoming environment to visitors of all abilities. Please let us know if you require ability assistance by contacting [email protected] in advance of this event.


    Register



  3. Podcasts To The Rescue! An Emerging Medium for Learning About Civics, Government, and the Social Contract


    Millions of Americans cast ballots in the 2018 Midterm Elections, but participation in our democracy was already on an upswing since Donald Trump won the Presidential Election in 2016. While 7 in 10 Americans report feeling generally negative about what is going on in the country today, Americans are also more hopeful about solving problems. This hopefulness may account for the increased interest in how our government works and what role individuals and communities can play in that process. And as ever, podcasters are responding to this interest by producing shows that tackle policy and civic engagement in a variety of formats.

    Podcasts To The Rescue! An Emerging Medium for Learning About Civics, Government, and the Social Contract will feature a diverse group of podcast hosts and producers, looking at the ways each podcast engages and informs listeners on how to stay invested in the social contract.

    ModeratorMatisse Bustos-Hawkes, Founder at Otro Lado Communications and former Associate Director, Communications & Engagement at WITNESS

    Panelists:

    • Arden Walentowski, producer and co-host of Let’s Get Civical, a comedic and irreverent take on how our government works

    • Harry Siegel, co-host of FAQ NYC, a weekly dive into the big questions about New York City produced by Alex Brook Lynn

    • Jenna Spinelle, producer and host of Democracy Works an initiative of the McCourtney Institute for Democracy at Penn State

    • Mila Atmos, executive producer and host of Future Hindsight, where civic engagement meets civil discourse

    • Allison Daskal Hausman, producer and host of The Pledge Podcast, inspiring portraits of ordinary Americans stepping up to strengthen our democracy.


    Panel discussions will take place 599 11th Avenue, 8th Floor, New York, NY 10003. The event is free but space is limited.

    Other panels in this series include:

    About The Metropolitan New York Library Council

    Located in New York City, the Metropolitan New York Library Council (METRO) is a non-profit member services organization serving more than 260 libraries, archives, museums, and cultural heritage nonprofits in New York City and Westchester County. For over 50 years METRO has provided a range of programs and services to its members, including grants, consultative and digital services, collaborative initiatives, and professional development and training.

    About Preserve This Podcast

    Preserve This Podcast is a campaign to protect podcasts against the threats of digital decay. The Preserve This Podcast zine, podcast, and traveling workshops promote affordable, easy-to-implement archival techniques for digital audio preservation. It is funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, hosted by the Metropolitan New York Library Council (METRO) through January 2020.

    Media Contact

    Sarah Nguyen
    Preserve This Podcast | METRO 599
    [email protected]

    We wish to provide a welcoming environment to visitors of all abilities. Please let us know if you require ability assistance by contacting [email protected] in advance of this event.


    Register



  4. Who Owns Your Content? A Look at Podcaster Rights


    Who Owns Your Content? A Look at Podcaster Rights will examine a variety of topics including content ownership, licensing, permissions and sponsorship.


    Moderator: Jeremy Helton, VP of Marketing & Communications at Audioboom

    Panelists:

    • Amanda McLoughlin, creator of Multitude podcast collective and consultancy, co-host of Spirits and Join The Party

    • Anne Kennedy McGuire, partner at Loeb & Loeb LLP

    • Jeanine Percival Wright, Chief Operating Officer & Chief Legal Officer at Simplecast

    • Molly Schwartz, podcast producer and Preserve This Podcast co-lead 


    Panel discussions will take place 599 11th Avenue, 8th Floor, New York, NY 10003. The event is free but space is limited.

    Other panels in this series include:

    About The Metropolitan New York Library Council

    Located in New York City, the Metropolitan New York Library Council (METRO) is a non-profit member services organization serving more than 260 libraries, archives, museums, and cultural heritage nonprofits in New York City and Westchester County. For over 50 years METRO has provided a range of programs and services to its members, including grants, consultative and digital services, collaborative initiatives, and professional development and training.

    About Preserve This Podcast

    Preserve This Podcast is a campaign to protect podcasts against the threats of digital decay. The Preserve This Podcast zine, podcast, and traveling workshops promote affordable, easy-to-implement archival techniques for digital audio preservation. It is funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, hosted by the Metropolitan New York Library Council (METRO) through January 2020.

    Media Contact

    Sarah Nguyen
    Preserve This Podcast | METRO 599
    [email protected]

    We wish to provide a welcoming environment to visitors of all abilities. Please let us know if you require ability assistance by contacting [email protected] in advance of this event.


    Register



  5. Preservathon/Preservashare 2019


    Rather than passively sitting and listening, as we have done in the previous 4 sessions this year, in this session folks will bring things that they are actively working or struggling on and share their preservation techniques and or ask for assistance from others attendees. For example, I want to learn how you run checksums and report on them.

    Note:
    For this to be valuable, let's hope for a large number of registrants.
    Also, please bring your laptop loaded with some assets, metadata and tools.

    Finally, please thank Davis @ Metro for facilitating space and scheduling. Without Davis and Metro, these opportunities would not be possible.


    Register



  6. If We Build It...: Sustainable Funding in Libraries and Archives


    It’s a familiar story.

    Institution identifies a need. Institution applies for grant funding. Institution receives funding (or fronts the money themselves), onboards staff, works for months toward a viable outcome. Funding ends. The project sunsets, and workers find themselves on the job market once more.

    While many initiatives find their footing, this cycle is all too real in the library, archives, and museum industry. Much-heralded project outputs fall into the rear view. New services end. Workers find themselves in an increasingly contingent labor market.

    Please join us for a daylong symposium hosted by METRO Library Council (599 11th Avenue, 8th Floor) on Friday, June 14. We’ll gather to share the stories of projects that got their start with temporary sources of money, hear from grant-makers who are witness to our growing financial needs, and consider potential paths forward.


    Agenda:

    10:00 am - 11:00 am - Morning Keynote with Roger Schonfeld, Ithaka S + R

    11:00 am - 11:15 am - Break

    11:15 am - 12:15 pm - Case Studies

    • Arden Kirkland, Design 4 Learning
    • Natalie Milbrodt, Queens Public Library
    • Sophie Gliddon-Lyon, La MaMa Archive
    • Bonnie Gordon and Maggie Schreiner, Interference Archive

    12:15 pm - 1:30 pm - Lunch (Offsite)

    1:30 pm - 2:30 pm - Funders Panel

    • James Neal, IMLS
    • Laura Maher, SFE

    2:30 pm - 2:45 pm - Break

    2:45 pm - 3:45 pm - Breakout groups

    • Nora Almeida, CUNY CityTech
    • Megan Wacha, CUNY
    • Grif Peterson, P2PU
    • Christian Zabriskie, Yonkers Public Library

    3:45 - 4:00 pm - Break

    4:00 - 5:00 - Closing Keynote with Claudia Depkin, Haverstraw King's Daughters Public Library


    Register



  7. Archives Connect: Developing an Educational Outreach Initiative for Your Archive


    Archives Connect: Developing an Educational Outreach Initiative for Your Archive

    Archives and special collections are poised to play a more significant and instrumental role in student achievement since the implementation of the Common Core standards. With a particular emphasis on 21st Century learning skills, including the ability to think critically, communicate clearly, and collaborate with peers to create high quality, scholarly work, these standards present an opportunity for archives to share their expertise with all educators and learners.

    This workshop models how participants can implement school outreach initiatives using the special collections and archives at their institutions, including how to utilize archival collections to meet Common Core Standards, create lesson plans, and engage students and teachers in history research to support a variety of academic disciplines.

    This workshop is for anyone who is interested in creating a program at their library or archive; no prior work in educational programming is required. 

    Registration includes a 120-page workshop booklet. 

    What to bring:

    • Notetaking materials

    About Our Instructors:

    Kaitlin Holt is Brooklyn Connections’ program manager. Prior to joining the Brooklyn Public Library as an educator in 2013, Kaitlin worked as a public programs facilitator at the Immigration Museum in Melbourne, Australia where she helped patrons track down illustrious immigrant pasts, and as an educator at the British Museum in London, England where she frolicked with mummies and the Elgin Marbles. She earned an M.A. in Museum Studies in 2010 from the University College London and B.A. in History from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2005.


    Julia Pelaez is Brooklyn Connections newest educator. She holds a M.A. in Teaching History from Bard College and has worked previously as an educator at the American Museum of Natural History. Julia advocates for the learning-disabled community, which she is a part of, to ensure that teachers are trained to integrate engaging materials and techniques to create inclusive classrooms. 


    Jen Hoyer is an Educator with the Brooklyn Connections program. She earned her MLIS at McGill University and joined the team after running a music outreach program in South Africa, working as a school librarian in Montreal, and organizing the archives of the oldest public lending library in Canada. 

    We wish to provide a welcoming environment to visitors of all abilities. Please let us know if you require ability assistance by contacting [email protected] in advance of this event.


    Register



  8. Code4Lib networking & social hour at METRO


    Come and catch up with friends and colleagues at this summer's social c4l NYC Meetup. Discuss your current projects and be inspired to start new ones.

    METRO will provide coffee and cookies--feel free to bring a snack to share. If there is interest, we can move to Gotham West Market after the event ends.

    This meetup is for everyone! From the code4lib "about us": "code4lib isn’t entirely about code or libraries. It is a volunteer-driven collective of hackers, designers, architects, curators, catalogers, artists and instigators from around the world, who largely work for and with libraries, archives and museums on technology 'stuff.'"


    Register



 

Policies

Payment

We accept payment by credit card or by invoice. Please note that we do not accept cash payment, on site or otherwise.

Workshop Cancellation

METRO reserves the right to cancel any workshop or to substitute instructors. In the event of a cancellation, postponement, or substitution, registrants will be notified in advance (if possible) via email and may receive a full refund of the registration fee.

Participant Cancellation

All registration cancellations must be submitted in writing to [email protected]

In order to receive a refund, we must receive your cancellation email at least 24 hours prior to the event start time. If METRO does not receive your cancellation email before that deadline, an invoice will be sent to recoup any unpaid fees. If you are unable to attend a workshop, you may choose to send another person in your place without penalty if you notify us in advance. Refunds are provided by credit card or check and will be processed within about four weeks.

Private Space

METRO will make private space available to nursing mothers upon request. Please contact us at [email protected] to make a reservation.

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