Code4Lib NYC

We are developers and technologists for libraries, museums, and archives who are dedicated to being a diverse and inclusive community, seeking to share ideas and build collaboration.” https://code4lib.org/about/

Open to all everyone interested in the coding, deployment, and design of library software, systems, and web services. This local chapter of Code4Lib, known as Code4LibNYC, aspires to channel the spirit of the national organization. We were formerly known as the “Library 2.0” SIG at METRO. We want to provide a forum for people who code for libraries to discuss their ongoing projects.

Would you like to speak at a future Code4Lib NYC meetup? Please fill out our open call for speakers: https://goo.gl/forms/bHHzfwUFxmYc8Gyd

Upcoming Events

Code4Lib NYC is planning our next event. Check back soon.

Past Events

Read on for information about what this group has done so far.

Introduction to SNAC (Social Networks and Archival Contexts)

Wednesday, November 13, 2019
4:00 PM to 6:00 PM EST

Join the code4lib NYC community and hear a member talk from Alexander Duryee of the New York Public Library and Iris Lee of the American Museum of Natural History.

Abstract:

SNAC (Social Networks and Archival Context) is a next-generation cooperative online resource focusing on the creators of primary source material. The cooperative includes, but is not limited to, archives, libraries and museums; working together to build a hub of people, families and organizations to provide a contextual understanding of historical records. Data in SNAC is structured in Encoded Archival Context for Corporate Bodies, Persons, and Families (EAC-CPF) underpinning the ‘Social Networks’ in SNAC, complementing descriptive context with a linked network of related entities.

The cooperative is made up of several working groups to collaboratively develop policies, governance, best practices, education, and technical tools to enhance the application. Alexander Duryee and Iris Lee co-chair the Technology Infrastructure Working Group (TIWG) supporting the developers of the application, providing user-friendly documentation to a wide range of users, and cultivating community development.

In this presentation, Alex and Iris will be giving an overview of SNAC, its history and development of the application, and current projects and research, followed by a demo of the REST API.

Bios:

Alexander Duryee is the Metadata Archivist at the New York Public Library. He manages the Library’s archival metadata systems, such as ArchivesSpace and archives.nypl.org, and develops integrations between local systems and international cooperatives. He graduated with his MLIS from Rutgers University.

Iris Lee is the Cataloging and Metadata Librarian at the American Museum of Natural History Library. She oversees descriptive cataloging for a variety of formats across several applications. Iris joined the Library in 2011 after working as a Digital Project Coordinator at the Whitney Museum of American Art Library. Iris co-teaches a graduate course at the Pratt Institute School of Information, Collection Cataloging & Digital Technology. She earned her MLS and certificate in Archives and Records Management at Queens College.

This meetup is for everyone! From the code4lib “about us”: “code4lib isn’t entirely about code or libraries. It is a volunteer-driven collective of hackers, designers, architects, curators, catalogers, artists and instigators from around the world, who largely work for and with libraries, archives and museums on technology ‘stuff.’

Code4Lib networking & social hour at METRO

Wednesday, July 10, 2019
6:00 PM to 8:00 PM EDT

Come and catch up with friends and colleagues at this summer’s social c4l NYC Meetup. Discuss your current projects and be inspired to start new ones.

METRO will provide coffee and cookies–feel free to bring a snack to share. If there is interest, we can move to Gotham West Market after the event ends.

This meetup is for everyone! From the code4lib “about us”: “code4lib isn’t entirely about code or libraries. It is a volunteer-driven collective of hackers, designers, architects, curators, catalogers, artists and instigators from around the world, who largely work for and with libraries, archives and museums on technology ‘stuff.'”

DAMS migration with Python at the Center for Jewish History

Tuesday, June 11, 2019
6:00 PM to 7:30 PM EDT

Join the code4lib NYC community and hear a member talk from Kevin Powell of the Center for Jewish History.

Bio:
Kevin Powell is the Center for Jewish History’s Rosetta Migration and Implementation Manager. He moved to NYC from Providence, Rhode Island where he worked as the Digital Preservation Librarian at Brown University. His interests professional interests include digital preservation, Python, and social justice.

Abstract:
The Center for Jewish History is a consortium of five co-located Jewish historical organizations. Each partner organization has its own staff, board, and collection development policy. The Center employs processing archivists, system librarians, conservation professionals, digital imaging specialists, and reference staff to support the partner organizations and their collections. This unique configuration is a source of many challenges as we migrate 50 terabytes of data from a 15 year-old proprietary DAMS to a brand new proprietary DAMS. As the Rosetta Migration and Implementation Manager, it is my role to face these challenges head on.

This implementation story is incomplete without a discussion of the programming language Python. I started this job as a Python novice and have used the Rosetta project as an opportunity to increase my knowledge. In the process, I built an application that is used Center-wide. The Rosetta Deposit Processor allows partner and Center staff to package, deposit, and track material in Rosetta from one central GUI application. I will go over the Processor origin story and talk about my long-term plans for the Processor and Python at the Center.

This meetup is for everyone! From the code4lib “about us”: “code4lib isn’t entirely about code or libraries. It is a volunteer-driven collective of hackers, designers, architects, curators, catalogers, artists and instigators from around the world, who largely work for and with libraries, archives and museums on technology ‘stuff.'”

Code4Lib NYC Winter meeting - Member presentations & refreshments

Tuesday, December 4, 2018
4:00 PM to 6:00 PM EST

==Speakers==

“Sharing current awareness” with Thomas Krichel

This will be a live demo of the “bims: Biomed news” at http://biomed.news, followed by some geek talk about some of the internals of the service. Bims is clone of NEP to PubMed. At this stage bims provides a tool that allows subject experts to effortlessly maintain a collection in their subject area. The collections are open information.

About Thomas: Made in Germany in 1965, Thomas Krichel is a digital librarian based in Novosibirsk and New York City. He works in the area of digital libraries for scholarly communication. His main claim to fame is the creation of the RePEc digital library for economics in the 1990s. He also started some of the RePEc services. The most relevant to this talk is “NEP: New Economics Papers” at http://nep.repec.org. This is a current awareness service for economics working papers maintained by academic volunteers.

“How to make Raspberry Pi Gatecounters” with Devlyn Courtier

The Hudson County Community College (HCCC) Library tested three different types of Raspberry Pi based people counters during the summer of 2017. This talk will describe how each was created, compare the accuracy of each sensor, and compare them to the college’s existing 3M 3501 gate counters. It will also describe why and how this project was created, and will discuss lessons learned.

About Devlyn: Devlyn Courtier is a Library Technology Associate at Hudson County Community College (HCCC), where he is responsible for troubleshooting technology issues and implementing new technology projects and infrastructure. Courtier has an Associate’s degree in Computer Science from HCCC, and has written and presented on topics such as the Raspberry Pi, video games, and makerspaces. In 2018, he was winner of the New Jersey Library Association’s Technology Innovation Award for his work in developing a Rapberry Pi based people counter.

==Host==

Whirl-i-Gig is the developer of CollectiveAccess, open source software for museums, archives and research, and a provider of consulting and support services to cultural, educational and scientific organizations worldwide.

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This meetup is for everyone! From the code4lib “about us”: “code4lib isn’t entirely about code or libraries. It is a volunteer-driven collective of hackers, designers, architects, curators, catalogers, artists and instigators from around the world, who largely work for and with libraries, archives and museums on technology ‘stuff.'”

Member Presentations with Meet & Greet

Tuesday, September 18, 2018
4:00 PM to 6:00 PM EDT

Talks:

Smooch: How I tripped on an adolescent hobby and stumbled into digital preservation?!
Libby Horacek of Position Development

When I was a teenager, one of my first coding projects was a digital dress-up doll using the Kisekae Set System (KiSS). In the years since, KiSS has largely died off, leaving a graveyard of over five thousand dolls. Three years ago, I decided it would be fun to build a web-based viewer for KiSS dolls called “Smooch”. In the process, I accidentally started a digital preservation project! Now as Smooch is nearly ready for its beta launch, I’m struggling with all sorts of questions about how to deal with copyright, pornographic content, and plagiarism.

In this talk, I’ll explain what KiSS is and how Smooch works, and describe some of the conundrums I’m running into as I prepare to make Smooch publicly usable.

About Libby:
Libby is a software developer with an interest building excellent, sustainable technical infrastructure for growing organizations. She works at Position Development (https://positiondev.com), a worker-run software company with a focus on independent media, cultural institutions and socially minded organizations.
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Managing research data with non-relational databases
Seth Kaufman, developer, Whirl-i-Gig, Brooklyn, NY

For decades relational databases have been the go-to tool for managing large data sets despite their structural limitations. In recent years there has been an explosion of options based on alternative “non-relational” data models that promise improved performance, scalability and ease of development. In this talk we’ll review the design and development of two data management applications built on these alternative models: (1) ePandda: an API providing access to over 60 million correlated paleontological data entries and (2) Inquisite: a user-focused platform for capture, preservation and dissemination of humanities research data. We will discuss the approaches considered and selected for these projects, and the real-world experiences operating these graph and document-oriented systems.

About Seth:
Wanting to develop robust open-source collections management solutions as an alternative to the expensive, inflexible commercial options available to museums, archives and other collecting institutions, Seth founded Whirl-i-Gig in 1995. His background includes training in civil engineering, computer science and graphic design, all pursued at the Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art in New York—where he also taught digital design and programming for seven years. Since 2003, Seth has been the lead developer and architect of CollectiveAccess, an open-source application for museum and archival collections management that is in use at scores of institutions across North America, Europe, Asia and Australia.
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Join the Code4Lib NYC meetup for member presentations and a meet & greet at METRO!

4pm-5pm: Member presentations (12-15 mins each)
5pm-6pm: Member meet & greet (METRO will provide coffee and cookies–feel free to bring a snack to share)

This meetup is for everyone! From the code4lib “about us”: “code4lib isn’t entirely about code or libraries. It is a volunteer-driven collective of hackers, designers, architects, curators, catalogers, artists and instigators from around the world, who largely work for and with libraries, archives and museums on technology ‘stuff.'”