Getting it Right on Rights and Orphan Works

Speaker Greg Cram
Greg Cram is the Associate Director of Copyright and Information Policy at The New York Public Library. Since joining the Library in 2011, Greg has endeavored to make the Library’s collections broadly available to researchers and the public at large. He is responsible for developing and implementing policy and practices ...

Greg Cram is the Associate Director of Copyright and Information Policy at The New York Public Library. Since joining the Library in 2011, Greg has endeavored to make the Library’s collections broadly available to researchers and the public at large. He is responsible for developing and implementing policy and practices around the use of the Library’s collections, both online and in the Library’s physical spaces. Greg has helped steer projects through a maze of complex intellectual property issues, including the recent release of more than 20,000 high-resolution images of public domain maps. Greg has represented the Library in advocating for better copyright policy, testifying before Congress about the doctrine of first sale and the United States Copyright Office about orphan works.


Before joining the Library, Greg served as the copyright clearance consultant to Leadership Team Development, a business support company that organizes thousands of meetings, seminars and conferences. He also worked as a licensing associate at Sanctuary Records, a large independent record label. He is a graduate of Boston University and The Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law. He is a licensed attorney in New York and Massachusetts.

Full Description

Libraries, archives, museums and other cultural heritage organizations are joining forces to make their digital collections more broadly accessible to users. As large aggregators such as the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) and Europeana collect data about digital collections, the variety of ways organizations use to describe the copyright status of collection items becomes painfully apparent. For DPLA content alone, contributing organizations have used over 85,000 different rights statements, making faceted searching nearly impossible. Users encountering these 85,000 different rights statements are often left confused and frustrated.

Over the last year, an international task force has worked to develop a common set of rights statements that are simple, flexible, descriptive, accurate and transparent. Their findings and recommendations have been published in a white paper that is currently open for public comment. Two of the recommended rights statements describe orphan works, or works for which no rightsholder could be identified or located after a reasonably diligent search.

In this session, Greg Cram, Associate Director of Copyright and Information Policy at NYPL and member of the DPLA/Europeana rights task force, will discuss the recently-issued DPLA/Europeana International Rights Statement White Paper, as well as some developments in the best practices for dealing with orphan works.

JUST ADDED: Greg will also review and distill the Copyright Office's newly released 234 page report on orphan works and mass digitization, as well as the proposed extended collective licensing (ECL) pilot program for certain mass digitization activities.

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When?

Thu, Jun. 18, 2015
4 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. US/Eastern

How Much?

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Where?

METRO Training Center
57 East 11th Street, 4th Floor
New York, NY 10003