NY3Rs Presents: Webinar: Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) - What Does it Mean for Libraries?

Speaker Amy Rudersdorf
Amy Rudersdorf is the Assistant Director for Content at the Digital Public Library of America, where she is responsible for digitization partnerships and related workflows, metadata normalization and shareability, and community engagement to promote the DPLA as a community resource. Before joining the DPLA, she directed the Digital Information Management ...

Amy Rudersdorf is the Assistant Director for Content at the Digital Public Library of America, where she is responsible for digitization partnerships and related workflows, metadata normalization and shareability, and community engagement to promote the DPLA as a community resource. Before joining the DPLA, she directed the Digital Information Management Program at the State Library of North Carolina, where she developed and managed digital preservation and digitization activities. She has worked with digital collections in special collections at North Carolina State University, coordinated a digital production group at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and worked with public libraries throughout Wisconsin to aid in the development and coordination of LSTA-funded digitization grants.

Full Description

The NY3Rs recently announced its participation in The Digital Public Library of America [DPLA] through the Empire State Digital Network. What will this mean for NYS libraries and library users? As collections are added to the DPLA's database, they are geo-coded, time-lined, and tagged with rich search information, enabling users to quickly draw connections between far flung materials that would have been impossible before.

The DPLA website dp.la launched April 18, 2013 with more than two million objects -- including digital renderings of photos, books, manuscripts and other items from places such as the Smithsonian Institution, along with museums, libraries, and historical institutions around the country. DPLA's mission is to unlock the rich trove of historical and cultural data -- including documents, photographs, artwork, maps and audio -- digitized, archived, and easily searchable thanks to rich metadata. Researchers, journalists, programmers and others are free to build their own applications for the data via the library's freely available API.

Registration is open to all METRO & other NY3Rs Members at no cost. Sign up here.

When?

Fri, Jan. 17, 2014
10 a.m. - noon US/Eastern

Where?

Online