Using MODS to Describe Cultural Heritage Resources

Speaker Rebecca Guenther
Rebecca Guenther has 35 years of experience in national libraries, primarily working on library technology standards related to digital libraries. Most of her professional life has been at the Library of Congress developing national and international standards related to metadata. She hasserved on numerous standards and implementation committees, several as ...

Rebecca Guenther has 35 years of experience in national libraries, primarily working on library technology standards related to digital libraries. Most of her professional life has been at the Library of Congress developing national and international standards related to metadata. She hasserved on numerous standards and implementation committees, several as chair, is widely published in professional literature, and has given many tutorials, workshops and presentations. She recently began to explore use of semantic web technology and the potential of linked data. She left the Library of Congress in August 2011 to work as a consultant on metadata development and planning. She currently lives in New York and is again working for LC on MODS, PREMIS and the Bibliographic Framework Transition Initiative, teaching in NYU's Moving Image Archiving and Preservation Program, and doing assorted other consultant activities.

Full Description

As digital resources have exploded, the world has recognized the need for tagged metadata and a number of descriptive metadata formats have emerged. The Metadata Object Description Schema (MODS) was developed in the early 2000s as a derivative of the MARC format to provide an XML format that is highly compatible with MARC and maintains much (but not all) of its richness. It has had wide implementation especially in the digital library community as a descriptive metadata schema that allows for minimal data loss from rich MARC catalog records and works well with XML data. This workshop gives an overview of its purpose, design principles, data elements, and how it is being implemented particularly in digital library projects. It will also touch on its relationship to the Bibliographic Framework Transition Initiative.

Who should attend:
Librarians, archivists, and other information professionals (e.g. in museums) who are implementing new approaches to metadata, especially for digital projects

Objectives:

  • To understand why MODS was developed and how it relates to MARC
  • To understand the design principles of MODS
  • To explore the companion format MADS for authority data and see how it works with MODS descriptions
  • To gain a knowledge of the main elements and subelements of MODS and how it repackages MARC elements
  • To see how MODS works with other metadata formats such as METS, MARC, and EAD
  • To explore how MODS has been implemented, especially in digital libraries
  • To consider use of MODS and MADS in a Linked Data environment
  • To consider how MODS is related to the Bibliographic Framework Transition Initiative

When?

Fri, Jun. 21, 2013
10 a.m. - 4 p.m. US/Eastern

How Much?

Event has ended

Where?

METRO Training Center
57 East 11th Street, 4th Floor
New York, NY 10003