Digital Forensics for Archivists

Speaker Dr. Christopher (Cal) Lee
Christopher (Cal) Lee is Associate Professor at the School of Information and Library Science at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. He teaches courses on archival administration; records management; digital curation; understanding information technology for managing digital collections; and acquiring information from digital storage media. He is a lead ...

Christopher (Cal) Lee is Associate Professor at the School of Information and Library Science at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. He teaches courses on archival administration; records management; digital curation; understanding information technology for managing digital collections; and acquiring information from digital storage media. He is a lead organizer and instructor for the DigCCurr Professional Institute, a week-long continuing education workshop on digital curation, and he teaches professional workshops on the application of digital forensics methods and principles to digital acquisitions.

Cal's primary area of research is the long-term curation of digital collections. He is particularly interested in the professionalization of this work and the diffusion of existing tools and methods into professional practice. Cal developed "A Framework for Contextual Information in Digital Collections" (Journal of Documentation), and edited and provided several chapters to I, Digital: Personal Collections in the Digital Era published by the Society of American Archivists.

Cal is Principal Investigator of the BitCurator project, which is developing and disseminating open-source digital forensics tools for use by archivists and librarians. He was also Principal Investigator of the Digital Acquisition Learning Laboratory (DALL) project, which investigated and tested the incorporation of digital forensics tools and methods into digital curation education. Cal has served as Co-PI on several projects focused on preparing professionals for digital curation responsibilities: Preserving Access to Our Digital Future: Building an International Digital Curation Curriculum (DigCCurr), DigCCurr II: Extending an International Digital Curation Curriculum to Doctoral Students and Practitioners; Educating Stewards of Public Information for the 21st Century (ESOPI-21), Educating Stewards of the Public Information Infrastructure (ESOPI2), and Closing the Digital Curation Gap (CDCG). In a project called Curation of a Forensic Data Collection for Education, Cal investigated and developed resources to enhance access and use of disk images to support digital forensics education.

Full Description

Are you starting to receive disks as parts of collections or have you discovered disks in boxes of paper records? Caring for the records stored on removable storage media (e.g. floppy disks, hard drives, thumb drives, memory sticks, CDs) requires archivists to extract whatever useful information resides on the medium, while avoiding the accidental alteration of data or metadata.  In this workshop, you’ll learn how to apply existing digital forensics methods and tools in order to recover, preserve and ultimately provide access to born-digital records. We’ll explore the layers of hardware and software that allow bitstreams on digital media to be read as files, the roles and relationships of these layers and tools and techniques for ensuring the completeness and evidential value of data. We’ll apply digital forensics tools and methods to test data, in order to illustrate how and why they are used.

Upon completion of this course you’ll be able to:

  • Explain the roles and relationships between the main layers of technology required to read a string of bits off of a physical storage medium and treat it as a file
  • Identify various forms of data that may be “hidden” on the physical storage medium
  • Use write blockers and create disk images in order to prevent accidental manipulation of volatile data
  • Identify and extract the data that a file system uses to manage files
  • Apply digital forensics tools and methods to collections of records
  • Identify and compare alternative strategies for providing public access to data from disk images

Who should attend?  This workshop is intended for any archivists, manuscript curators, librarians or others who are responsible for acquiring or transferring collections of digital materials, particularly those that are received on removable media.

What should you know already? Participants are expected to know basic archival practice and have intermediate knowledge of computers and digital records management.  We strongly recommend that participants complete the Thinking Digital web seminar prior to taking this workshop.

Attendance is limited to 28.

For more information and to register, please visit http://saa.archivists.org/4DCGI/events/330.html?Action=Conference_Detail&ConfID_W=330&Time=2039105930

ART and METRO members both receive a discount of $25 off the early bird registration price by entering code DFA25NY during online registration.

This course is one of the Tools & Services Courses in the Digital Archives Specialist (DAS) Curriculum and Certificate Program!  If you intend to pursue the Certificate, you'll need to pass the examination for this course. Please follow Option 1 to access exam information.

This course builds on others in the Digital Archives Specialist (DAS) curriculum including Basic Electronic RecordsThinking Digital, Accessioning and Ingest, and Beginner’s Guide to Metadata.

When?

Fri, Jun. 29, 2012
9 a.m. - 6 p.m. US/Eastern

Where?

METRO Training Center (4th floor)
57 E. 11th Street
New York, NY 10003
United States