Introduction to Encoded Archival Description (EAD)

Speaker Lara Nicosia
Lara Nicosia graduated from Syracuse University with an M.S. in Library & Information Science and M.A. in Museum Studies in 2008 and a Certificate of Advanced Study in Digital Libraries in 2009. She first learned EAD working in Syracuse University’s Special Collections Research Center as the Dana Foundation Teaching Fellow ...


Lara Nicosia graduated from Syracuse University with an M.S. in Library & Information Science and M.A. in Museum Studies in 2008 and a Certificate of Advanced Study in Digital Libraries in 2009. She first learned EAD working in Syracuse University’s Special Collections Research Center as the Dana Foundation Teaching Fellow from 2008-2009. During this time, she converted nearly 150 finding aids to EAD format. More recently, Lara worked as a Project Archivist at the Rochester Institute of Technology Archive Collections creating EAD finding aids for over 200 collections, designing XSL and CSS stylesheets, and assisting in the development of a search portal for published findings aids. Between these two positions and various internships, Lara has experience using a variety of software packages and tools for EAD encoding. She is currently the Liberal Arts Librarian/Liaison at the Rochester Institute of Technology in Rochester, NY.

Full Description
This is a full-day workshop that includes hands-on encoding experience. The workshop will begin with a brief introduction to EAD, its applications, and its relationship to other standards (LCSH, DACS, etc.). After learning about the basic structure of an EAD document and the elements required by DACS for minimum-level description, participants will use an EAD template to encode a basic finding aid. The afternoon will be spent working with common tags such as those needed to create an inventory list. By the end of the session, each participant will be able to render his or her own finding aid in a web browser using an XSL stylesheet that will be provided. Other topics that will be covered include project workflow, best practices, ways EAD is being used, and additional tools and resources for getting started.
 
Who should attend:
Individuals with no or limited experience working with EAD. Participants should be familiar with basic archival practices such as collection processing and finding aid structure.
 
By the end of this program, participants will:
- Understand what EAD is and how it is used
- Encode an EAD finding aid that meets minimum-level requirements
- Create an EAD finding aid that can be viewed in a standard web browser
- Know where to find resources and tools to complete future EAD projects
Organizer Laura Forshay

When?

Fri, Dec. 9, 2011
10 a.m. - 4 p.m. US/Eastern

How Much?

Event has ended

Where?

METRO Training Center (4th floor)
57 E. 11th Street
New York, NY 10003
US